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Dr. Nelson Noa
Fields of Research
Dr. Nelson Noa
School of Management & Economics
  • Negotiation and conflict management at work, with a current emphasis on gender and negotiation, and on organizational and personal antecedents of employees conflicts and conflict management.

Short Bio

Dr. Nelson is a lecturer at the School of Economics and Management in The Academic College of Tel Aviv Yaffo (MTA), teaching MA courses in organizational psychology, organizational development, and negotiation and conflict management in organizations. Dr. Nelson also supervises MA research in organizational psychology. She earned her Ph.D. degree in Social-Organizational Psychology from Bar-ilan University, for a dissertation on the effects of gender and power on negotiators' behavior and outcomes. After which, she continued research in organizational psychology, mostly in the field of negotiation and conflict management. Currently,  Dr. Nelson is leading two lines of research: the first, on mediators and moderators of gender effects on employee's negotiation initiation; and the second, on organizational (culture, leadership) and personal (motivation) antecedents of employees' conflicts and conflict management. She serves as reviewer for scholarly journals, among them Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Journal of Conflict Management, Employee Relations, and Journal of Negotiation and Conflict Management Research. Her works are published in peer-reviewed journals and presented in international conferences.


Selected Publications


  1. Nelson, N., Kalfon – Hakhmigari. M., Horesh, N. (2022). Initiating salary negotiations: a mixed-methods study into the effects of gender, shame and pay-raise justifications. International Journal of Conflict Management. [Published online ahead of print]

  2. Nelson, N., Fox, R., Cohen, M. (2022). Trait-resilience and work-family conflict: a two-study test of the associations of interpersonal and intrapersonal resilient traits with reduced work-family conflict. International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior, 25, 113-130.

  3. Nelson, N., Appel, O. (2021/2). Perceived procedural justice enhances correctional officers' organizational citizenship behavior: Causal and correlational evidence from Israel. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 49(2), 164 – 180.

  4. Shacham, R., Nelson, N., & Ben-ari, R. (2021). Resilient negotiators: the effects of trait negotiation resilience on behavior, perception and outcomes. International Journal of Conflict Management, 32(3), 361-382.

  5. Nelson, N., Peleg-Koriat, I., Ben-ari, R. (2018). Perceived procedural justice and conflict management in intimate relationships: the moderating effects of anxious attachment and personal power. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice, 7(1), 34-46.

  6. Peleg-Koriat, I., Nelson, N., & Ben-ari, R. (2017). The Effects of Perceived Procedural Justice on Conflict Management between Spouses, and the Mediating Role of Dyadic Adjustment. Negotiation Journal, 33(2), 129-152.

  7. Nelson, N., Shacham, R., & Ben-ari, R. (2016). Trait Negotiation Resilience: a measurable construct of resilience in mixed-interest interactions. Personality and Individual Differences, 88, 209-218.

  8. Nelson, N., Bronstein, I., Shacham, R., & Ben-ari, R. (2015). The power to oblige: power, gender, and negotiation behaviors. Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, 8(1), 1-24.

  9. Nelson, N., Schechter, D., & Ben-ari, R. (2014). Procedural justice and conflict management at school. Negotiation Journal, 30(4), 393-419.

  10. Bronstein, I., Nelson, N., Livnat, Z., & Ben-ari, R. (2012). Rapport in negotiation: The contribution of the verbal channel. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 56(6), 1089-1115.

  11. Nelson, N., Albek – Solomon, R., Ben-Ari, R. (2011). Are your disputants secure, and does it matter? Attachment and disputants' speech during mediation. Negotiation Journal, 27(1), 45-68.

  12. Nelson, N., Zarankin, A., Ben-Ari, R. (2010). Transformative women, problem-solving men? Not quite. Gender and mediators’ perceptions of mediation. Negotiation Journal, 26(3), 287-308..

https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ajWM8MYAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao 

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